All Canon Lenses in one spreadsheet

This is a very useful spradsheet done by Jhon Lane showing all lenseseven discontinued ones that can fit Canon mounts their manufacturer, their internet price, reviews, filter size, lense hood etc…
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FAQ: Canon EF 100 400 L IS

I am about to buy the Canon EF 100 400 L f/4.5 f/5.6 lensso i don’t have it yet 😉 so I have read many many threads about it in different forums and I am trying to build a “Frequently Asked Questions” list to save time for anyone who wants to buy it in the future.

If you happen to read this thread and feel there is any FAQ I missed, please kindly add it in the comment and I will update the list

1) What is the Canon EF 100 400 L IS usage?
2) Do I need to buy tripod mount for the Canon EF 100 400 L IS?
3) Do you hate the push/pull zoom system of the Canon EF 100 400 L IS?
4) How does the Canon EF 100 400 L IS compares to the Canon EF 70 200 L f/2.8 IS?
5) Does the Canon EF 100 400 L IS performs better than the Canon EF 70 200 L 2.8 IS with a teleconverter?
6) Do you have any problems using the Canon EF 100 400 L handheld?
7) Can I still put a 1.4x teleconverter on the Canon 100 400 L IS and be happy?
8) Can I still put a 2.x teleconverter on the Canon EF 100 400 L IS and be happy?

1) What is the Canon EF 100 400 L IS usage?

This Canon lens is a very popular lens and is used in a great varieties of photography like wildlife, birding, sport and landscape.

2) Do I need to buy tripod mount for the Canon EF 100 400 L IS?
No, this lens ships with a Tripod Mount Ring B
3) Do you hate the push/pull zoom system of the Canon EF 100 400 L IS?
This question is rather hard to answer simply because owners seems to be divided, but most of them agree that you can easily get used to it. Some even claims that it is rather practical for sport photography. Big issue with the push/pull? It sucks dust right into your sensor
4) How does the Canon EF 100 400 L IS compares to the Canon EF 70 200 L f/2.8 IS?
This one is unanimous, all the forums threads I’ve read agrees that the Canon EF 70 200 L f/2.8 wipes the floor, or if you prefer wins hands down against the Canon EF 100 400 L IS in their overlapping zoom range.
5) Does the Canon EF 100 400 L IS performs better than the Canon EF 70 200 L 2.8 IS with a teleconverter?
Well it depends on the teleconverter itself, it seems that the Canon EF 70 200 L with a 1.4x has a slightly better image quality than the 100 400 L, but that the Canon EF 100 400 L IS wins if you decide to add a 2x teleconverter to the Canon EF 70 200 IS L f/2.8
6) Do you have any problems using the Canon EF 100 400 L handheld?
It seems that if there is one advantage in the push/pull design this is it, and since the lens extends when going on the long side it make is easier to support handheld
7) Can I still put a 1.4x teleconverter on the Canon 100 400 L IS and be happy?

From the Image Quality side, the Canon EF 100 400 L IS and a 1.4x teleconverter is still pretty pretty good, the down side of this combo is the Auto Focus. Remember that the 100 400 is a f/4.5 f/5.6 lens and that the teleconverter will make you loose an extra stop so it will be a f/5.6 f/8. Canon EOS cameraswith the exception of the 1D bodies using only the central focus point can’t focus past f/5.6.
If you are using a cheap teleconverter like the Tamron “base” model not the pro. This teleconvert will not pass aperture information to your camera so, although you EXIF data will be wrong, the camera will not know you are past the f/5.6 and will still try to autofocus.
Now if you have a Canon 1.4X teleconverter or the Tamron “pro” series etc… your Canon EOS camera (unless you have a 1D series body) will know it is at f/8 and autofocus will be disabled. A small trick you can do is tape the 3 pins (or paint them with nail varnish) as shown in this image

Please not I did not take this picture, I saw it in one of the forums, just thought it would be useful to share it

Please also not that even if the Camera will not know you are at f/8 and tries to autofocus, this doesn’t mean that it will and sometimes the AF system will just haunt
8) Can I still put a 2.x teleconverter on the Canon EF 100 400 L IS and be happy?
Although some claims that they are happily using this combo, most believe (or affirms by experience) that with a 2x autofocus will not be possible and the image quality loss is considerable.

Support ADIDAP and buy the Canon EF 100 400 L from Amazon

DIY 4 Channels Wireless Camera Remote for Canon

DIY

Here is a tutorial on how to build a 4 channels wireless remote control for you Canon EOS camera.
The total cost of this project is around $50.

All needed materials can easily be found at ebay and radioshack
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What do Camera Settings Mean?

This article is written by a fellow photographer Ariel lepor and is being posted on adidap.com with his permission

Sometimes I, like many photographers, mention the camera’s settings when posting a photograph or when explaining how to set a camera for different types of photography. These settings look much like this: f/2.8, 1/125s, 400mm, ISO: 200. These are the lens’s and sensor’s specifications during the shot and are controlled by the camera automatically or by the photographer manually on the lens or in manual mode (M), program mode (P), aperture priority (A or Av), shutter priority (S or Tv), the camera’s zoom controls, and internal menus.

Let’s take these settings one at a time.

* f/2.8 (Use A/Av, P or M mode) – This is called the f-number, and refers to the aperture (shutter opening) size. There are many common aperture sizes, denoted by f/[a number] (that number being a multiple of 1.4 or 2), which are used when photographing. As you can see from the below diagram, the larger the number, the smaller the aperture. Don’t be confused by that, though. If you’ll notice, the number (pupil diameter) is being divided by f (focal length), so, mathematically, it makes sense that the larger the number, the smaller the aperture. Practically speaking, now, the lower the f-number — the more light comes in and the narrower the depth of field [DOF – area (distance from the camera) which is in focus in a single picture].

* 1/125s
(Use S/Tv, P or M mode) – Shutter speed. The shutter speed is how long the aperture remains open for a picture. This is in a similar format to the aperture (1 divided by a number). The larger the lower number, the shorter the shutter speed. When the shutter speed is one second or longer, it is often indicated by 1″, 1s, or 1 second. Very fast shutter speeds (like 1/1000s) are used when trying to freeze action. Slow shutter speeds are often used when photographing in low light situations without a flash or when trying to show motion.

* 400mm
(Zoom) – X mm (millimeters) refers to the focal length. The “standard” focal length is 35mm, which is close to what the non-peripheral part of the human eye sees. When the mm number increases, then the camera is zoomed in more. The higher the mm number, the smaller the depth of field. For those who think in terms of “x times zoom”, let’s call 35mm “1 x zoom”, since 35mm is generally the standard, widest-angle most basic cameras offer, although the number could be different. When the mm is doubled, to 70mm, you are now at 2 x zoom. Similarly, a camera at 2 x zoom probably is at 70mm. 400mm would be 11.5 x zoom.

* ISO: 200
(Film speed) – The ISO setting refers to the “film speed” or sensor sensitivity. Common ISOs are 50, 64, 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1600, and 3200. Higher ISOs mean the sensor (or film) is more sensitive to light — the ISO is directly proportional to the brightness of a photo. One downside to high ISOs, however, is that high ISOs lead to grainy photos with a lot of noise (multiple colors showing up in splotches where there should be only one color).

Vote for your preferred photographer

I think it would be interesting to see among the photography community who is currently considered the best living photographer.

I know I missed many, please feel free to add yours